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Monday, January 31, 2011

Catering Services on the Rebound, Consumers Seeking Healthier Options

January 27 2011 | Shannon Bryant | Ad-ology

Though the recession brought a period of famine to the catering foodservice industry, the feast is at hand as growth initiated in 2010 will continue through 2012 due to aggressive expansion into the catering space by limited–service establishments, the return of business event–driven spending, higher wedding spending, and a moderately healthier consumer, according to “Catering Trends in U.S. Foodservice,” by market research publisher Packaged Facts.


“Self–standing catering operations dominate sales, but full–service restaurants, limited–service restaurants and snack and beverage concepts also contribute significantly. Driven by aggressive catering launches and expansions, our experts view restaurant–based catering as a growth area into 2012,” says Don Montuori, publisher of Packaged Facts.

Catering revenue exceeded $14 billion in 2010 for an increase of 9% over a stormy 2009. Sales are expected to increase 9% and 7% in 2011 and 2012 respectively. Catering at foodservice and drinking places generated 75% of the catering market size, or $11 billion, in 2010, up 8%. Limited–service establishments are expected to lead catering sales growth through 2012 due to the segment’s ability to leverage moderate menu pricing structures, provide portable fare, and offer in-house operations capabilities.

The recession brought declines in both corporate and consumer spending on catered events. However, Packaged Facts predicts that as the economy continues to recover, businesses will be eager to build revenues again and such eagerness may indirectly fuel the catering business through increased sales meetings, business travel, and convention attendance. Recovery will also spur consumers to entertain with more catered affairs. Weddings, graduations, births, funerals, and other milestones will return as catalysts for consumer spending on catering.

Meanwhile, consumers seeking healthier options have caused a significant change in catering, offering an advantage to companies that highlight the health benefits of their products. Key among these is Subway, which has long promoted the low–fat sub sandwiches on its menu as part of its marketing plans. Other caterers are also seeing a preference for healthier choices, with consumers opting for Greek yogurt, granola, and toasted nuts instead of bagels and donuts, for instance.

More Information> https://www.packagedfacts.com/Catering-Trends-Foodservice-2848313/


[Source:  "Catering Trends in U.S. Foodservice," Packaged Facts.  11 Jan. 2011.  Web.  18 Jan. 2011.] Full Article: http://www.marketingforecast.com/archives/9777/trackback

Monday, January 24, 2011

Download White Paper: 2011 Consumer Insights and Trends: Packaged Facts Forecasts the Product and Social Trends That Will Make Their Mark in 2011


The ball dropping in Times Square, resolutions, diets . . . all these are familiar signifiers of a new year. So, too, are prediction lists: what’s going to be hot, what’s not.

We at Packaged Facts have some experience gazing into a crystal ball and divining trends for the consumer marketplace (publishing market research studies on consumer goods and services for more than 50 years can come in handy . . .).

This month we gathered our market experts and asked them for their predictions regarding the product and social trends that will make their mark in 2011. Download our free whitepaper to hear Packaged Facts' analysts insights and predictions on:

    * Retailing Trends
    * Pet Market
    * Apparel Industry
    * Consumer Hobbies
    * Personal Care Products
    * The Use of Social Media
    * Food and Beverage Market
    * Baby Boomer Attitude and Behavior Shifts


Download:
http://www.packagedfacts.com/catalog/search.asp?query=white+paper

Friday, January 14, 2011

Study: Modest Growth in Pet Supplement Sector

Study: Modest Growth in Pet Supplement Sector

Posted: January 11, 2011, 5:30 p.m., EDT | Pet Product News International


Growth of pet supplement and nutraceutical treat sales in the U.S. stalled in 2010, but the category is expected to gradually pick back up in the next five years, according to a report released today by market research publisher Packaged Facts.Growth of pet supplement and nutraceutical treat sales in the U.S. stalled in 2010, but the category is expected to gradually pick back up in the next five years, according to a report released today by market research publisher Packaged Facts.

“As the economy improves, so should all things pet, but that recovery continues to appear modest,” said David Lummis, senior pet market analyst for Packaged Facts. “Spending on supplements will increase, but restraint will likely continue to characterize how pet owners shop and what they buy during 2011 and even 2012, making value appeals based on pet health, safety, professionalism, practicality, and yes, pricing, more important than ever.”

From 2006 to 2010, sales of pet supplements and nutraceutical treats grew at a compound annual growth rate of about 4 percent, to reach $1.2 billion in 2010, according to the report.

Following zero overall growth in 2010, Packaged Facts forecasts U.S. retail sales of pet supplements and nutraceutical treats to begin to pick back up in 2011, with the annual sales gains regaining steam through 2015. By this account, the annual percentage increases will rise from 2.4 percent in 2011 to 6.5 percent in 2015, lifting sales to approximately $1.6 billion in 2015, according to the report.
Packaged Facts anticipates growth to be considerably faster on the small animal side, which includes dogs, cats, birds, small mammals and herps, than on the equine side, with the compound annual growth rates coming in at 7.4 percent and 2.2 percent, respectively. As a result, small animal is expected to account for 58 percent of the market by 2015, up from 52 percent in 2010.

Thursday, January 13, 2011

Catering Foodservice Rebounds from Recession, Growth Forecast through 2012

Catering Foodservice Rebounds from Recession, Growth Forecast through 2012

New York, January 11, 2010— Though the recession brought a period of famine to the catering foodservice industry, the feast is at hand as growth initiated last year will continue through 2012 due to aggressive expansion into the catering space by limited–service establishments, the return of business event–driven spending, higher wedding spending, and a moderately healthier consumer, according to Catering Trends in U.S. Foodservice by market research publisher Packaged Facts.

"Self–standing catering operations dominate sales, but full–service restaurants, limited–service restaurants and snack and beverage concepts also contribute significantly. Driven by aggressive catering launches and expansions, our experts view restaurant–based catering as a growth area into 2012," says Don Montuori, publisher of Packaged Facts.

Catering revenue exceeded $14 billion in 2010 for an increase of 9% over a stormy 2009. Sales are expected to increase 9% and 7% in 2011 and 2012 respectively. Catering at foodservice and drinking places generated 75% of the catering market size, or $11 billion, in 2010, up 8%. Limited–service establishments are expected to lead catering sales growth through 2012 due to the segment’s ability to leverage moderate menu pricing structures, provide portable fare, and offer in-house operations capabilities.

The recession brought declines in both corporate and consumer spending on catered events. However, Packaged Facts predicts that as the economy continues to recover, businesses will be eager to build revenues again and such eagerness may indirectly fuel the catering business through increased sales meetings, business travel, and convention attendance. Recovery will also spur consumers to entertain with more catered affairs. Weddings, graduations, births, funerals, and other milestones will return as catalysts for consumer spending on catering.

Meanwhile, consumers seeking healthier options have caused a significant change in catering, offering an advantage to companies that highlight the health benefits of their products. Key among these is Subway, which has long promoted the low–fat sub sandwiches on its menu as part of its marketing plans. Other caterers are also seeing a preference for healthier choices, with consumers opting for Greek yogurt, granola, and toasted nuts instead of bagels and donuts, for instance.

Catering Trends in U.S. Foodservice offers the insight and analysis market participants need to plan their catering and foodservice strategies, especially in regard to caterers as providers of single event-based food services. The scope of the market size and forecast is restricted to caterers; full–service restaurants; limited-service restaurants; snack and non–alcoholic beverage establishments; foodservice contractors; and hotels. For further information, please visit: http://www.packagedfacts.com/Catering-Trends-Foodservice-2848313/.

About Packaged Facts—Packaged Facts, a division of MarketResearch.com, publishes market intelligence on a wide range of consumer market topics, including consumer goods and retailing, foods and beverages, demographics, pet products and services, and financial products. Packaged Facts also offers a full range of custom research services. To learn more, visit: www.packagedfacts.com. Follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter.

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Market Insights:Latino Shoppers

Market Insights: A Selection From The Report

Buying Power Used to Measure Market Size
This Packaged Facts report uses “buying power” to measure the size of the Hispanic market. Buying power is another term for “disposable personal income,” which is defined as the total after-tax income available to an individual to spend on personal consumption, personal interest payments and savings. Hispanics Show Increasing Economic Clout As a result of above-average population growth and improved earning power over the past three decades, Latinos have been responsible for an ever-growing share of consumer buying power in the United States. Packaged Facts estimates that in 2009 Latinos accounted for 9.1% of total buying power, compared to only 3.8% in 1980. [Figure 3-1]
Hispanic Consumer Units Profiled
Latino consumer units differ from non-Hispanic consumer units in a number of ways. Hispanic consumer units are larger, include more children, and are more likely to include multiple earners. They are more likely to be renters and less likely to have a college education. [Table 8-2]
Spending Patterns Differ
The spending habits of Latino households differ from those of non-Hispanic households. Food at home is one of the most prominent categories in which Latino consumers spend relatively more than other consumers. Latinos spend 9% of their household budgets on buying food to prepare at home, compared to the 7.5% spent by other consumer units.
View Table of Contents »

Health, Budget Concerns Will Drive Food Flavor and Ingredient Market in 2011

Health, Budget Concerns Will Drive Food Flavor and Ingredient Market in 2011

New York, January 11, 2011 — Consumer thriftiness and health-consciousness will continue to exert a notable influence over the food and beverage ingredient and flavor trends to emerge in 2011, according to Food Flavors and Ingredients Outlook 2011, the eighth edition of the annual series by market research publisher Packaged Facts.

"Heading into 2011, consumers are growing evermore weary of economic and nutritional health gloom and doom. Many have spent the last few years reinventing their financial and employment lives, and are now starting to focus more emphasis on their overall wellbeing and happiness in a way that is reflective of their values, being more pragmatic and deliberate in making decisions about how to spend both their time and their resources," says Don Montuori, publisher of Packaged Facts.

Packaged Facts believes food marketers, from the retail and foodservice sectors, will take that consumer mindset to heart in 2011. Some of the key trends Packaged Facts forecasts to hit it big in 2001 are:

  • Flavors From Around the Globe – Ethnic food will remain a bright spot for foodservice and retailers, providing variety and interest without taxing smaller food budgets. The growing presence of food trucks, with their varied ethnic fare at reasonable prices, will bring this national trend home to the local level.

  • Sustainability Trumps Local, Organic and Natural – Local, organic and natural foods will more often be connected with eco–friendliness and a more holistic lifestyle approach to eating that promotes sustainability. As a result, Packaged Facts predicts that there will be greater use of natural, organic, local and antibiotic and hormone–free ingredients at quick serve restaurants (QSRs) and fast casual restaurants in 2011. At retail, the popularity of private label organic products is anticipated to continue while growth in directly marketed local and organic produce, meats and locally processed foods sold via farmers’ markets and community-supported agriculture (CSA) is anticipated.

  • Wellness Overhaul – Packaged Facts anticipates that food will get more attention as the foundation of health, and wellness activities will be better integrated into overall lifestyle. Growing recognition that digestive health is a key link in promoting overall good health will help drive sales of yogurt and other foods containing probiotics, but gluten-free foods will likely show signs of slowing down after a year of explosive growth that some might consider to be a fad.

  • Plethora of Produce – Vegetables, more so than fruit, will take on added importance in 2011 as they move to the center of the plate. More fine–dining restaurants are starting to focus on vegetables as the main attraction, with either no accompanying meat, or used sparingly, as a condiment to accentuate flavor. Look for considerable menu experimentation with taste palates developing to savor a broad array of produce, with the likes of turnips, parsnips, black and purple kale, broccoli, spigarello, Romanesco, eggplant, celeriac, and sunchokes becoming more commonplace.

  • Flavor & Ingredient Crossovers – A key trend will be even more two–directional crossover of savory ingredients into sweet foods and sweet ingredients into savory foods. For example, Packaged Facts expects the use of olive oil to extend into a wide range of desserts and sweet goods including ice cream and gelato, cake and muffins.

  • Satisfying Sweets – Packaged Facts anticipates that agave will surrender some of its sweetening prominence to less exotic but always special honey as stevia still gains ground at a slower pace. Figs, pears, cherries and blackberries look likely to be the most popular fruits, along with the superfruit combination of blueberry and pomegranate. America’s appreciation of artisanal and retro desserts is expected to continue in 2011 with home–made pie and ice cream showing a great deal of creativity.

Food Flavors and Ingredients Outlook 2011, 8th Edition highlights predictions for the key drivers that will affect the U.S. food and beverage industry including rising food prices, consumer desire to take control and remain tight–fisted, actual vs. perceived thrift, government and industry pressure for a healthier diet and more focus on pragmatic lifestyle choices to promote happiness and well being. For further information, please visit: http://www.packagedfacts.com/Food-Flavor-Ingredients-2706877/.

About Packaged Facts—Packaged Facts, a division of MarketResearch.com, publishes market intelligence on a wide range of consumer market topics, including consumer goods and retailing, foods and beverages, demographics, pet products and services, and financial products. Packaged Facts also offers a full range of custom research services. To learn more, visit: www.packagedfacts.com. Follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter.

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Sales of Pet Supplements for Dogs and Cats Not Recession Resistant, but Nevertheless Resilient



Sales of Pet Supplements for Dogs and Cats Not "Recession Resistant," but Nevertheless Resilient
New York, January 11, 2011 — Making good on its famed "recession resistance," the overall U.S. pet industry has fared well during the recession relative to many other consumer packaged goods industries, but pet owners have not been immune to the economic downturn. As a result, certain industry segments saw growth stall in 2009, including the pet supplements industry. However, Pet Supplements and Nutraceutical Treats in the U.S., 3rd Edition by market research publisher Packaged Facts forecasts a return to strength for supplement sales as the optimism of pet owners gradually recovers in harmony with the general economy.

"As the economy improves, so should all things pet, but that recovery continues to appear modest," says David Lummis, senior pet market analyst for Packaged Facts. "Spending on supplements will increase but ‘restraint’ will likely continue to characterize how pet owners shop and what they buy during 2011 and even 2012, making value appeals based on pet health, safety, professionalism, practicality, and yes, pricing, more important than ever."

Packaged Facts estimates total U.S. retail sales of pet supplements and nutraceutical treats at more than $1 billion in 2010, reflecting a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 4% during the five–year period beginning in 2006. Sales growth stalled in 2009 and 2010 as the recession took hold and held on, a slow–down attributable almost entirely to a downturn on the equine side. As a result, the small animal category–including products for dogs and cats–gained ground between 2006 and 2010, increasing from 45% to 52% of the market and surpassing equine as the larger category last year.

U.S. retail sales of pet supplements and nutraceutical treats are expected to begin to pick back up in 2011, with the annual sales growth regaining steam through 2015. By this account, the annual percentage increases will rise from more than 2% in 2011 to almost 7% in 2015, lifting sales to an estimated $2 billion. Growth will be considerably faster on the small animal side than on the equine side. For both animal classifications, the pace will be faster in nutraceutical treats, which will continue to gain ground because of their indulgence advantage and a steady influx of more heavily marketed products. Ultimately, small animals will account for 58% of the market by 2015.

Pet Supplements and Nutraceutical Treats in the U.S., 3rd Edition segments the market into two categories–supplements and nutraceutical treats (i.e., those containing supplements or novel botanical ingredients addressing specific health conditions, such as glucosamine for joint health)–with a primary focus on products for dogs and cats, but also extending to horses and other types of companion animals including birds, small mammals, and reptiles. The report provides a forward–looking examination of the market from every angle, including breakouts by supplement type and retail channel, analysis of the complex and evolving regulatory situation, competitive structure and marketing trends, new product tracking, and consumer profiling. For further information, please visit: http://www.packagedfacts.com/Pet-Supplements-Nutraceutical-2588715/.


About Packaged Facts —Packaged Facts, a division of MarketResearch.com, publishes market intelligence on a wide range of consumer market topics, including consumer goods and retailing, foods and beverages, demographics, pet products and services, and financial products. Packaged Facts also offers a full range of custom research services. To learn more, visit: www.packagedfacts.com. Follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter.
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For Immediate Release
Contact:
Jenn Tekin
Packagedfacts.com
(240) 747-3015
jtekin@packagedfacts.com

Friday, January 7, 2011

What’s Cooking for 2011: Adventurous Flavors & Wellness Foods Propel New Food & Beverage Trends

In the News

What’s Cooking for 2011:

Adventurous Flavors & Wellness Foods Propel New Food & Beverage Trends


New York, January 6, 2011 — Burrowing out of the recession, hungry consumers will be exploring more exotic territory in the quest for unique flavors and nourishing foods in 2011. The Center for Culinary Development (CCD) and Packaged Facts, expert trend trackers, make their predictions on the food and beverage trends that will be buzz-generating this year.

Using CCD’s signature 5–stage Trend Mapping® technique–where Stage 1 trends are emerging from independent restaurants and Stage 5’s have landed in the mainstream–CCD and Packaged Facts have identified eight culinary trends that will be attracting adventurous diners and influencing product development this year. These trends will be profiled in 2011 issues of the bi–monthly Culinary Trend Mapping Report.

Douglas Fir and other "Wild by Nature" Flavors: Stage 1 — Fine dining chefs have a new source for ingredients: nature. They are finding new ingredients by foraging in forests and along seashores, seeking new plants, herbs and flowers to flavor creative dishes and add a touch of the wild. Mixologists will join in the fun adding "wild" flavors at the bar.

Cloudberry: Stage 1 — This alpine and arctic berry is an element of trendy Nordic cuisine. Traditionally made into jams and liqueurs, it’ now appearing in beer, wine and sparkling drinks. Could this be the next elderberry for the beverage world?

Arepas: Stage 1 — This South American griddled cornmeal patty is both tasty and versatile, such that areperias have already spread across Latin America and areas in the U.S. with Colombian and Venezuelan immigrants. One San Francisco-based Venezuelan restaurateur has already turned arepas into trendy sandwich carriers for local foodies, and we expect to see them spread to many more urban areas considering they are filling, delicious, vegetarian–friendly and gluten–free.

Yuzu and Exotic Citrus: Stage 2 — We have been spotting new foods made with the floral–flavored Japanese lime at Fancy Food Shows lately and believe this trend is ready to blossom. With lime already such a flavor standard, yuzu and other more specialty citrus varieties like sudachi will offer consumers an exciting exotic twist for salad dressings, beverages and condiments.

Coconut Oil: Stage 2 — The word is spreading about the many health benefits of coconut oil. It has a positive effect on metabolism due to its medium–chain fatty acid structure and also is a great substitute for butter for dairy-free baking and cooking. The fact that it makes stir–fried greens taste great seals the deal.

Popovers & Gougéres: Stage 2 — American consumers are ready for new savory baked goods to freshen up the breadbasket. The traditional airy popover and cheesy French cream puff are well positioned to do just that, being versatile, pop–able and novel.

Grass–fed Dairy: Stage 3 — Free of artificial hormones and containing higher levels of healthful fatty acids, products made from grass–fed dairy appeal to both health–focused consumers and those seeking more natural, traditional and authentic foodstuffs.

Umami
: Stage 3 — American consumers are becoming more sophisticated about great tastes that come from umami, the fifth flavor found in many fermented and aged products, as well as seaweed, meat stock, parmesan cheese and tomatoes. Expect to see more applications of umami–laden ingredients—soy sauce, fish sauce, dashi, mushroom broths —in 2011.

Overarching interest in Flavor Adventure and Wellness is driving food and flavor trends this year, illustrating how worldly our palates are becoming and how good–for–you foods can also be delicious and a little exotic. Look for our upcoming 2011 Culinary Trend Mapping Reports on Extreme & Edgy Flavors, Baked Goods, Condiments & Sauces, New Old–World Cuisine and Fats & Oils.

The Culinary Trend Mapping Report is co–published by the Center for Culinary Development and Packaged Facts. Individual issues and annual subscriptions are available at www.packagedfacts.com/landing/culinarytrends.asp.

About the Center for Culinary Development — CCD is a full–service food and beverage strategic innovation company that successfully blends culinary creativity with consumer insights, trends and marketing expertise. Visit www.ccdsf.com, or contact Kara Nielsen at (415) 693-8900 x110, kara@ccdsf.com.

About Packaged Facts — Packaged Facts, a division of MarketResearch.com, publishes market intelligence on a wide range of consumer market topics, including consumer goods and retailing, foods and beverages, demographics, pet products and services, and financial products. Packaged Facts also offers a full range of custom research services. To learn more, visit: www.packagedfacts.com Follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter.


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Tuesday, January 4, 2011

Boulder's Evol, famous for burritos, turning attention toward other frozen foods - Boulder Daily Camera

Boulder's Evol, famous for burritos, turning attention toward other frozen foods - Boulder Daily CameraBy Alicia Wallace Camera Business Writer
Posted: 12/26/2010 09:30:00 PM MST

Jason Espinoza checks the seal on the burrito packaging and racks the burritos for the refrigerator at Evol Foods in Boulder on Dec. 9. ( MARK LEFFINGWELL )
If officials behind a Boulder-based frozen burrito company get their way, the Evol empire will spread in 2011 and do so in a very cold -- yet, brightly lit -- place.

A year after the Boulder-bred Phil's Fresh Foods gained some investors and rebranded itself as Evol Burritos (not sinister, it's 'love' spelled backwards), the company changed its name once again. Now operating as Evol Foods, the local manufacturer is launching a line of frozen gluten-free bowl entrees and has grander plans to tackle other sides of the frozen food market, founder Phil Anson said.

"It evolved really quickly into a big overall convenience brand," Anson said. "Over time, we'll be in entrees and you'll see us go into other categories that are as big or bigger than entrees."

What those could be, Anson's not saying right now, just that Evol Foods will broaden its offerings more in the spring and summer.

Although he's staying mum, Anson expressed confidence in Evol Foods' ability to gain a foothold in the sector. Consumers are looking for something fresh, new and different, he claimed.

"That's why we launched Evol," he said. "We really wanted to create a lifestyle brand that people can connect with."

Anson said he also sees a big gap on the meat front, especially in the natural, organic, active and health-focused arena.

"Just because people want natural and organic products doesn't mean they don't want meat," he said.

Evol Foods is expanding in a sector that had "strong" growth during the past five years, but also experienced a slowdown this year.

During 2006 to 2010, sales in the frozen foods and beverages channel increased $10 billion, or 21.7 percent, for a compound annual growth rate of 5 percent, according to an industry report released this month by Packaged Facts. The projected sales gain of 1.7 percent, or $900 million, for 2010 would be the weakest during the period; although, sales gains in the preceding
Jason Espinoza checks the seal on the burrito packaging and racks the burritos for the refrigerator at Evol Foods in Boulder on Dec. 9. ( MARK LEFFINGWELL )
years could have been driven by higher prices, officials for the market research firm said in the report.

While some consumer spending has contracted during the economic downturn, frozen foods have been affected to a lesser extent, according to the report.

"The new economic reality feeds two opposing trends in consumer goods markets, including frozen foods: premiumization (upscaling) and cutting back (downsizing)," Packaged Facts officials wrote in the report. "Rather than canceling each other out, these two trends interact in the face of slow economic recovery as consumers juggle how to get the most out of less money or less spending."

Evol Foods' sales multiplied in 2010, Anson said, noting the company should finish the year up 200 percent from 2009.

The brand's distribution also exploded. As Phil's Fresh Foods, the burritos were sold in 700 stores. Now, as Evol, they are sold in 5,000 to 6,000 locations, he said.

Anson said the key to future expansions -- in sales, products and areas such as food service -- will include his "foodie" mindset and keeping on top of the variety of food-related trends.

"Monitoring what's happening from white tablecloth restaurants to mobile eating, my ears are attuned to all of those things," he said.

Wellness Ingredients

Wellness Ingredients: Culinary Trend Mapping Report

Long before today’s pharmaceutical industry, civilizations treated illness with diets meant to balance one’s humors (Greeks), yin and yang (Chinese) or doshas (Ayurveda). Whatever the bodily ailment or concern, food in the form of herbs, spices, barks, teas, soups and what-have you was administered to make a body better. This age-old notion is regaining traction, and represents a growing trend in the American health and wellness arena today.

Consumers are more engaged than ever trying out new foods and diets in hopes of curing what ails them or preventing ailments to which they are susceptible. Consumers’ participation in uncovering and treating various conditions with food is part of this era’s DIY-care mentality. Hobbled with healthcare issues and economic woes, while simultaneously emboldened by innumerable Internet pages and a growing understanding and acceptance of alternative medical systems —Traditional Chinese Medicine with its acupuncture, holistic medicine and its tinctures, naturopathy and even yoga—consumers have never had more motivation or ammunition for finding new cures themselves, especially diet-related ones.
The wellness ingredients profiled in this report all have this ancient medicinal wisdom element in common. These ingredients have been consumed for healthfulness by cultures around the world for centuries, and are finding new life today in natural food stores as well as the natural food aisles in mainstream grocery stores.
  • Stage 1: Healing Spices — Holy basil and turmeric are two Ayurvedic staples situated at Stage 1 but gaining momentum in the health food world as functional ingredients with therapeutic properties. Boasting digestive and mental health benefits, these spices are being incorporated into teas, nut butters and energy bars.
  • Stage 2: Hemp — Although industrial hemp production remains illegal in much of the U.S., the market for hemp products is flourishing. Hemp seed is the edible part of the hemp plant, and it packs quite a nutritional punch. No wonder it’s become a healthful booster to everything from nut bars to milk to salad dressing.
  • Stage 2: The New (Old) Fermented Foods — Fermented foods like miso, kasu, tempeh and pu-erh tea are rapidly gaining adherents as consumers seek out foods that are less processed and more nutrient-rich. Benefits range from an ability to improve digestion to naturally high protein content, and these imported superfoods can enhance taste, too.
  • Stage 2: Sprouted Foods — Health-focused manufacturers are sprouting wheat, rice and other grains, nuts and seeds and using them as a base for wholesome grain goods that offer more nutrition and are more digestible than similar products made without sprouted grains.
  • Stage 3: Grass-fed Meat & Dairy — Grass-fed Meat & Dairy has an impressive health halo as well as an improved reputation for taste. It also feeds into consumers’ desires for more authentically good-for-you products, those our grandparents and great-grandparents relied on.
  • Stage 3: Agave Nectar — Agave nectar fits well with consumer desires for a more healthful plant-based sweetener. Its lower-than-white sugar glycemic index means it helps maintain even blood sugar levels, and because it is sweeter than sugar, consumers can use less of it, making it a good value.
  • Stage 5: DHA — Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA) may be the hottest long-chain fatty acid you can’t pronounce. DHA is a source of Omega-3 that is being promoted for its ability to enhance brain function and development.
• • • • •
The Culinary Trend Mapping Report is an indispensable tool for those whose job it is to stay abreast of what's hot - and what will be - in the food world.
The reports leverage the Center for Culinary Development’s (CCD) signature Trend Mapping technique, a validated method for identifying which culinary trends are gaining traction and which are simply flashes in the pan.
Each 65+ page journal is packed with trends, data, strategies and insights on the food industry that simply aren't available anywhere else.
Each Issue of the Culinary Trends Mapping Report

  • Identifies the maturity level of foods and ingredients according to CCD’s unique, proprietary 5-stage trend mapping process.
  • Concentrates on a theme that is affecting the food industry, and then looks at the emerging and established trends along the Trend Map that are shaping this theme.
  • Delves into these trends and what they mean for you and the manufacturing, retailing, and foodservice industries.
  • Gives strategic insight into how consumers are thinking of and reacting to new foods and ingredients.
  • Provides business know-how regarding opportunities, challenges, and ways to implement current trends into foodservice, retail, and packaged goods operations.
  • Presents a feature interview with a member chef from CCD’s exclusive 80+ member Chefs’ Council who offers expert analysis and unique perspective on a specific trend.
Trend Mapping
Trend Mapping is guided by the premise that major food trends pass through five distinct stages on their way to the mainstream:
  • Stage 1: The ingredient, dish and/or cooking technique appears at upscale dining establishments, ethnic and popular independent restaurants.
  • Stage 2: The item is featured in specialty consumer-oriented food magazines such as Bon Appetit plus retail stores such as Sur La Table that target culinary professionals and serious home cooks.
  • Stage 3: The item begins to appear in mainstream chain restaurants—Applebee's or Chili's—as well as retail stores such as Williams-Sonoma that target recreational cooks.
  • Stage 4: Publications such as Family Circle and Better Homes and Gardens pick up the buzz.
  • Stage 5: Finally, the trend makes its way to quick service restaurant menus and either starts to appear or gains increased mainstream presence on grocery store shelves.
Availability
Published bimonthly, the Culinary Trend Mapping Report is available for purchase as a single issue or a six-issue subscription.

Monday, January 3, 2011

Economically Potent and Increasingly Acculturated Latino Consumers Spend More, Display Strong Financial Optimism

New York, December 21, 2010 — The United States population of Hispanic consumers wields a formidable combination of fiscal optimism and buying power in excess of $1 trillion, making progressively more acculturated Latinos a demographic capable of shaping the nation’s future economic and marketing trajectory, according to Latino Shoppers: Demographic Patterns and Spending Trends among Hispanic Americans, 8th Edition by market research publisher Packaged Facts. Hispanic buying power is projected to reach $1.3 trillion in 2015, a cumulative increase of around 25%.

"Although suffering their full share of job losses and foreclosures, Hispanic consumers are more optimistic than non–Hispanic white consumers about their own personal financial situation and about the future of the American economy," says Don Montuori, publisher of Packaged Facts. "Between 2008 and 2009 above–average growth in the Hispanic population caused aggregate spending by Latino households to increase slightly even as spending declined in non–Hispanic households. Considering that one in six Americans are now of Hispanic heritage, Latino consumers will remain influential over the ensuing years, especially because there are a significant number of high–income Latino households."

Marketers must be aware of how increasing acculturation will affect the decisions of Latino shopping behaviors. Compared to their low–acculturation counterparts, high–acculturation Latinos are much more likely to own credit cards, take out loans and have health and life insurance, according to the report.  They are also less influenced by advertising and product placements but are much more alert to in–store promotions. Additionally, they are far more likely to shop and buy online and from catalogs. Packaged Facts further reveals that more education leads to better paying jobs and increasing influence among high–acculturation Latinos, who are more likely than their low–acculturation counterparts to work as managers and professionals, are more likely to own their own homes, and are twice as likely to have a household income of $75,000 or more.

Although advertising campaigns have increasingly featured Hispanics and Hispanic themes, marketers targeting Hispanic consumers must recognize substantial regional differences in the composition of the Hispanic population. For instance, Latinos living in  western and southwestern states tend to be of Mexican heritage, while Latinos in the Northeast have a much more varied country–of–origin background. With an estimated buying power of $616 billion, Latinos of Mexican heritage represent the single most influential segment of the Hispanic market. Mexicans in the U.S. account for 59% of all Hispanic buying power. On a per capita basis, however, Cubans are the most affluent of the major Hispanic population segments.

Latino Shoppers: Demographic Patterns and Spending Trends among Hispanic Americans, 8th Edition provides an in–depth look at the shopping habits and spending patterns of Hispanic consumers today. It also provides a glimpse into Latino shoppers of the future. As more acculturated Latinos become an ever–larger share of the population, marketers may need to address the potential for a significant change in the profile of the Latino consumer. This Packaged Facts report provides important insights into the way acculturation may affect the shopping behavior and buying decisions of Latinos in the years to come. For further information, please visit: http://www.packagedfacts.com/Latino-Shoppers-Demographic-2848314/.

About Packaged Facts—Packaged Facts, a division of MarketResearch.com, publishes market intelligence on a wide range of consumer market topics, including consumer goods and retailing, foods and beverages, demographics, pet products and services, and financial products. Packaged Facts also offers a full range of custom research services. To learn more, visit: www.packagedfacts.com. Follow us on Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter.
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The $20,000 Pet

by Nancy Keates, published December 22, 2010, Smart Money

For Mary Cotter, the first sign of concern came when her 7-year-old, Logan, appeared dizzy. His regular doctor said everything was fine, but Cotter insisted Logan be seen by a neurologist, who after an MRI found a tumor in his inner ear. An operation followed, and for the next month Cotter took Logan on a four-hour round-trip trek every day from her home in Ledyard, Conn., to a specialty hospital in Boston for radiation therapy.

A new CT scanner at New York's Animal Medical Center boasts shorter scan time and higher-quality images.
The total bill for the tests, blood work, surgery and radiation came to $14,000 — not surprising in this age of sky-high medical costs. Except for one thing. Logan is a golden retriever. After another surgery for an unrelated illness, the total cost of Logan's care is approaching $20,000. Today Logan is healthy, but he has a new nickname: "20K."

It's no secret that Americans love their pets. But these days, all that love is leading to an unprecedented level of expense for millions of owners, who are only beginning to understand the pet-world concept of sticker shock. Caught up in a wave of new medical options and lured by an increasingly sophisticated cadre of veterinarians, pet owners across the country are forking over thousands — and even tens of thousands — of dollars to treat illnesses that would have gone undiagnosed or untreated just a few years ago. And then doing it again if they have to. Of course, pet owners and most vets have the animals' best interest in mind. But that doesn't make it any easier: With health insurance covering the humans in many families, it's not unusual for pet owners to spend far more money on health care for their cats and dogs than for their sons and daughters. Even the Great Recession failed to take a bite out of Fido's health care tab. According to a report by market-research company Packaged Facts, Americans spent $20 billion on veterinary bills in 2010 — an 8.5% increase from a year earlier and more than double the amount spent just a decade ago.

Much of that money is being spent on new medical technology. With some of the advances in human health care spreading to the animal kingdom, pet owners have many more options for treatment—and many more chances to fork over money to cure their pets or at least prolong their pets' lives. Dogs and cats can have pacemakers implanted at a cost of $1,000 to $1,500, while pets with kidney failure can get a kidney-clearing procedure that runs $20,000 to $25,000 for just the first few weeks. Not long ago a vet would most likely have recommended euthanasia for a cat or dog diagnosed with cancer or another serious illness. Today high-tech procedures and equipment, such as chemotherapy and MRIs — and yes, CAT scans — allow for better diagnosis and more-advanced treatment.

They also require highly trained specialists. In the past three years, the percentage of veterinarians who are board certified for small-animal surgery has more than doubled, according to the American Veterinary Medical Association. Until the late 1980s, there were no board-certified veterinary oncologists, for a simple reason: There was no program for certification. Now vet schools offer oncology-specialization programs and have full-fledged cancer centers, while dozens of private centers have opened across the country with board-certified staff. At the Animal Cancer Center at Colorado State University, 14 veterinarians specialize in medical, surgical and radiation oncology. They're supported by a full nursing staff, residents and even a clinical-trials team focusing on diseases from canine lymphoma to feline sarcoma. Add it all up and "it's a revolution," says Stephen Withrow, the center's associate


Read more: The $20,000 Pet - SmartMoney.com http://www.smartmoney.com/personal-finance/health-care/the-20000-pet-1292884111206/#ixzz19yyRj7HW

Women dominating postsecondary ranks

Market Insights: A Selection From The Report

Bolstered by revenue safeguards such as federal food programs and student loans, K–12 and college foodservice has emerged as an industry bright spot expected to grow steadily over the next several years, according to The Education Foodservice Market in the U.S.: Elementary, Secondary and Higher Education by market research publisher Packaged Facts.

Women dominating postsecondary ranks
For fall 2008, 19.57 million students were enrolled at all Title IV postsecondary institutions. 18.97 million of these students were enrolled in a 4-year undergraduate program (48.0% of total enrollment), a graduate program (12.7% of total enrollment) or a 2-year program (36.3% of total enrollment).
  • Among the 9.39 million students enrolled in a 4-year undergraduate program, 7.42 million (or 79.0% of all 4-year undergraduates) were enrolled full time and 5.26 million (or 56%) were female.
  • While graduate students were more evenly split between full-time and part-time status, some 61% of graduate students were female.
  • 2-year institutions also enrolled a higher percentage of females, but about 59% of 2-year students were enrolled part time.
View Table of Contents »

Energy Drinks and the New Food-Supplement Continuum

Written by David Sprinkle for Natural Product Insider

Energy drinks and energy shots have been one of most remarkable success stories in the mass-market for foods and beverages. According to SymphonyIRI data presented by Packaged Facts at the 2010 SupplySide West conference in Las Vegas, Red Bull posted $45 million in dollar sales gains through supermarkets, drugstores and mass-merchandisers for the 52-week period ending October 2010, even with the exclusion of Wal-Mart, as well as convenience stores. Although sales growth has leveled off from an average 31-percent annual rate throughout the middle of the decade, Red Bull dollar sales were up 12 percent for the most recent period. Even that relative tapering off in growth is partly attributable to thunder-stealing by Living Essential’s 5-Hour energy shots, which are posting 58-percent annual growth through these outlets.

Table 1: Selected Leading Dollar Sales Gainers by SymphonyIRI Tracking in Food, Drug and Mass Outlets (52 Weeks Ending Oct. 3, 2010)
Brand Line $ Sales % Chg $ Gains
Chobani Yogurt(Greek-style) $196M 246% $140M
Red Bull Energy Drink 410 12 45
Fage Total Yogurt (Greek-style) 123 57 45
5-Hour Energy Shot 118 57 43
Dannon Activia Yogurt 251 20 41
Nature’s Bounty Mineral Supplements 233 20 38

Energy drinks and energy shots serve as a wake-up call to the rest of the beverage market. Major marketers and megabrand managers certainly took notice of the sales success, as evidenced by new product introductions, such as AriZona Energy drink, Crystal Light Energy drink mix (“caffeine and energy releasing B vitamins to help you feel energized”), Minute Maid Natural Energy Strawberry Kiwi with Yerba Maté (“a delicious juice drink providing a natural energy lift”), and Snapple’s Elements Energy Drinks or AriZona's new Fast Shots (A.M. Awake, Rx Energy). Food manufacturers also learned the energy lesson, as evidenced by new products, such as General Mills’ Fuel Wheaties, which aims to boost an athlete’s energy, endurance and performance.

Part of the marketer enthusiasm for energy drinks and energy shots stems from the fact that these new products, like formerly newfangled sports/activity drinks, invert the usual age pattern for dietary and nutritional supplementation. Use of nutritional supplements overall, as indicated by the Experian Simmons Spring 2010 national consumer survey, rises from 36 percent of Gen Y-ers to 76 percent of senior citizens. Consumption of Red Bull energy drinks, in contrast, falls from 19 percent among Gen Y adults to 3 percent among Boomers and virtually nil among seniors. Use of 5-Hour energy shots, similarly, takes a plunge after a usage peak of 7 percent (twice the average) among Gen Y adults.

Table 2: Use of Red Bull Energy Drink by Adult Generational Cohort
Age Cohort Percent
Adults Overall 7.3%
Gen Y (18-29) 18.9
Gen X (30-44) 9.5
Boomers (45-64) 3.2
Seniors (65+) n/a
Source: Compiled by Packaged Facts based on Experian Simmons Spring 2010 National Consumer Survey.

Energy drinks and energy shots are also important for underscoring that consumer priorities in dietary and nutritional supplementation are not necessarily, and for younger consumers, not even primarily, about health concerns. A Packaged Facts online consumer survey in 2009 asked U.S. adults whether they had purchased food or beverage products within the prior 12 months specifically because of nutritional benefits in relation to health conditions or concerns. This survey showed 71 percent of adults purchased food or beverage products for this reason, with energy levels (24 percent) and appearance/beauty (23 percent) edging out such medical concerns, such as digestive health (22 percent), cholesterol, obesity/weight management and immunity as the top triggers for such purchases (Packaged Facts, Functional Foods and Beverages in the U.S., 2009). A follow-up survey in 2010 showed 10 percent of U.S. adults strongly agree they “frequently” choose foods and beverages because they are naturally rich in specific nutrients, and 32 percent somewhat agree.

That almost three-fourths of adults make at least trial purchase of food or beverage products for functional reasons testifies to the blurring of the food and supplement markets. Historically, food was natural. Whether from farm or sea, food was associated with nature’s bounty—or, too often, the lack thereof. Even turning agricultural crops into bread, cheese or wine relied on basic natural and physical processes, such that these traditional foodstuffs did not seem, conceptually speaking, to fall very far from the tree.

In the modern era of American supermarkets, that paradigm faded. Nationally branded packaged food “products” claimed the spotlight, and the reliability, abundance, variety and heavily marketed innovation of branded products tended to relegate farm foods to second-class status. Moreover, both the focus on branded food products and the distinctively modern luxury of choosing from among too many foods along supermarket aisles helped pave the way for consumer adoption of nutritional supplements. If food manufacturers tossed extra vitamins and minerals into their processed foods, why not toss multivitamins into your shopping cart? If food product choices hinged in part on the presence of desirable nutrients, why not cut to the chase and buy those nutrients in isolated form?

Most recently, nature’s bounty has made a comeback in the form of whole foods and consumer demand for natural/organic, seasonal, fresh, local and sustainable food options. At the same time, nutritional supplements have kept their place at the table, such that Packaged Facts projects retail sales of supplements to average 7-percent annual growth from $9.4 billion in 2009 to $13.2 billion in 2014.

US Retail Sales of Nutritional Supplements

What is notable here is the mildness of our awareness of contradiction (reservations within the medical community notwithstanding). Without stirring up much sense of incongruity, ultra-traditional Greek yogurts and high-tech Activia fly off the shelves together. Without much tripping of consumer wires, Whole Foods Market is a leading retailer of nutritional supplements, Nature’s Bounty is a leading supplement brand, and supplement manufacturers are busily adopting food marketing product claims, such as gluten-free, vegetarian and even single-serve.

Table 3: High Growth Nutritional Supplement Package Tags/Claims, 2005 vs. 2009
Package Tag/Claims Increase
No Gluten 56%
Vegan 41
Vegetarian 34
Natural 32
No Dairy 26
No Sugar 24
Single Serving 23

A continuum has emerged in the food and beverage market from whole foods and superfoods to fortified/functional foods and supplements. In response to myriad dietary and nutritional concerns, American consumers have characteristically chosen an “all of the above” approach. This new continuum has brought superfoods, along with fortified/functional foods and beverages, to the sweet spot of new product development, such that these center-of-continuum products will continue to account for disproportionate share of the best-selling, most profitable entries in the market.

Because of amped-up competition and the proliferation of hybrid products along this food-to-supplement continuum, marketers of nutritionally positioned foods and beverages face multiple challenges. One is to create products that combine key nutrients and benefits/functions in ways that make instant, intuitive sense to busy consumers. Another is to create products that are tasty and wholesome enough to compete with nature’s bounty. Superfood products have an advantage here, as evidenced by the success of Greek-style yogurt. Another challenge is creating products that are convenient and portable enough to compete with pills. Functional/fortified foods and beverages have an advantage here, as evidenced by the success of 5-Hour energy shots. Navigating this continuum effectively will help turn consumer trial of your product into wake-up-and-smell-the-energy retail success.



David Sprinkle is research director for Packaged Facts (PackagedFacts.com), Rockville, MD, and co-publisher of Culinary Trend Mapping Reports, a joint publication with the Center for Culinary Development (CCDSF.com), San Francisco.

Sunday, January 2, 2011

A sweet finish to the year

A sweet finish to the year

Christmas is a lucrative time for local chocolatiers as they continue to weather the economy's downturn.
Last update: December 23, 2010 - 10:08 PM

The machines were humming this week inside the sprawling factory at Abdallah Candies in Burnsville. A worker gently sprinkled sea salt onto dark chocolate pieces as they moved along a conveyor belt, while two women on a nearby line stamped "B's" into the warm chocolate that enveloped a vanilla-butter-cream filling.
"They're going out the door as fast as we can make them," said CEO and owner Steven Hegedus, the fourth generation to run the company, as he surveyed the 65,000-square- foot plant. "Business is brisk."
Christmas makes up 35 to 40 percent of annual sales at Abdallah, which manufactures chocolate candies and confections for more than 6,000 gift and specialty food stores across the country, as well as Lunds and Byerly's locally. The company specializes in "everyday chocolate," generally priced lower than most handmade artisan brands, but higher than, say, Hershey's.
If America's sweet tooth provides insight into how consumers feel about the economy, chocolatiers such as Hegedus have some hope for the year ahead.
"We put resources into infrastructure so that when the economy picked up, we'd be poised to be at the next level of production," he said. "That's exactly what's happening now. The recession's not over, but it's picking up."
The $17.3 billion U.S. chocolate industry has expanded, but hasn't regained its prerecession pace of growth, according to consumer market research firm, Packaged Facts. Sales have been resilient mainly because the percentage of Americans who buy chocolate -- 3 out of 4 -- has remained steady.
Industry experts attribute that relative vigor to what economists call the "lipstick factor," where sales of small luxury items stay strong during times of economic hardship because of their ability to lift spirits.
Nonetheless, the recession has forced a handful of chocolate makers in the Twin Cities to become more nimble, and to think of their business in new ways.
Brian McElrath and Christine Walthour, a husband-and-wife team who own wholesaler B.T. McElrath, have completed shifted their business model. A couple of years ago, they manufactured mostly filled chocolates. But in 2009 they boosted production of high-quality chocolate bars.

Food, Beverage Trends That Shaped 2010

Market research publisher Packaged Facts and the Center for Culinary Development released its “Culinary Trend Mapping® Report" that features the Top 10 trends that shaped the food and beverage marketplace in 2010.

Using their signature 5-stage Trend Mapping® technique—Stage 1 being the emerging phase and Stage 5 a mainstream presence—CCD and Packaged Facts identified the following top 10 food trends that had the largest impact on menus and grocery shelves in 2010.
  1. Gourmet-On-The-Go (Stage 1). Street food was on fire this year, made by cooks and chefs of all stripes. One notable subset was fine-dining chefs serving upgraded street food either in restaurants or from refurbished carts and taco trucks, while foodie entrepreneurs made specialized, high-quality cuisine available on the go.
  2. “Fine Fast" Sandwich Shops (Stage 1). Gourmet sandwich shops took the art of sandwich-making seriously. They were often helmed by fine-dining chefs and featured high-quality, artisan and locally sourced ingredients, as well as a wide range of house-made condiments and toppings.
  3. Boutique Booze (Stage 2). Boutique booze was all the rage in 2010, from bars that specialize in a single type of liquor to festivals that celebrate spirits made by independent producers. Local liquor outlets benefitted from newly flexible blue laws and the legalization of liquor tastings in stores and at factories, as well as the growing consumer enthusiasm for all things handmade and artisan.
  4. Condiments, Preserved Foods & Heirloom Produce (Stage 2). A rising number of people grew produce from heirloom seeds, revived the art of home canning and made condiments and preserved products of all kinds. This resulted in new thriving DIY communities as this new wave of artisans found outlets for their products at craft and farmers markets, online and at specialty retail stores.
  5. Parisian Macarons (Stage 2). Macarons were found this year in a wealth of high-end bakeries and gourmet-food retailers—and became a staple of food photography.
  6. Bahn Mi & Bao (Stage 2). Bao (a Taiwanese pork-based sandwich, served on a white flour bun) and banh mi (a Vietnamese sandwich featuring grilled meat or pâté served on French bread) perfectly marry the novel with the familiar, appealing to consumers who love sandwiches but are searching for flavor adventure. Both bao and banh mi made waves in 2010 in urban centers like San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York and Chicago, as well on the street from myriad of street food trucks and carts.
  7. Butchery (Stage 3). Butchers stole the headlines this year, acting as unexpected emissaries of the heritage meat and artisan trends that came together to renew popular demand for handcut meat. With the upsurge in production and consumption of high-quality meat, young and aspiring foodies flocked to butchery demonstrations to feel closer to the sources of their food.
  8. Agave Nectar (Stage 3). Agave nectar became the much-talked-about sweetener in 2010, stealing a bit of stevia’s thunder.  A syrup that can be easily added to products ranging from beverages to baked goods to sauces to confections, agave nectar has demonstrated its versatility in the 300+ agave-bearing products already on the market and available in retailers like Whole Foods and Trader Joe’s.
  9. Eggs All Day (Stage 4). The egg is being placed front and center as a food that is inexpensive, healthful and adaptable, whether for a sandwich or wrap, to accompany a salad, on a pizza, mixed with pasta.
  10. Better Burgers (Stage 5). Building better burgers became a nationwide obsession in 2010, whether it meant adding exotic toppings, using grass-fed and locally sourced beef, or finding the perfect bun. Fine-dining restaurants added dressed up versions on their menus while chain restaurants responded to customer demand for better quality meat by using Angus and Kobe-style American Wagyu beef for their burgers.